praise child

Six Ways to Upgrade Your Praise

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March 2, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy – Six Ways to Upgrade Your Praise

Six Ways to Upgrade Your Praise

There are many ways to upgrade your praise of your child’s accomplishments.  Parents and teachers walk a fine line in complimenting children. Too much “over-the-top” praise might even have a negative effect.  The child may feel that he is being manipulated.  So, what are the keys to making your praise meaningful?

 Focus on Improvement

Canned “This is the most creative art project in the class.”

Credible “Your art project is even more detailed than last time.”

Emphasize the Effort

By praising a child’s effort, you help her to be confident about taking on new challenges,” says Carol Dweck, Ph.D., professor of psychology at Stanford University, in California.  “ It also instills resilience, which will come in handy when the going gets rough.”

Canned “I’m proud you didn’t get anything wrong on the spelling test.”

Credible “I see you worked hard on memorizing the spelling words.”

Be Understated but Sincere

“It’s a curious phenomenon, but people believe things they overhear more than things that are told to them,” says Dr. Harvey Karp, M.D., Parents advisor and creator of the DVD and book The Happiest Toddler on the Block.Karp.  “Kids this age trust understated praise more than overstated praise,” says Low-key praise seems more honest and sincere.

Canned “You’re a great big brother.”

Credible To Father:  “You should have seen Ben helping Lila put her toys away today.”

Spotlight Specific Achievements

Canned “Terrific job selling all those Girl Scout Cookies!”

Credible “It was smart to smile and look customers in the eye when you asked them to buy the cookies.”

Take Time to React 

Instead of reacting right away, allow your child to evaluate and appreciate his own work; it lays the foundation for building self-esteem.

Canned “It’s so exciting that you won a ribbon at the science fair.”

Credible “Hmmm. Would you like to tell me about this ribbon?”

Acknowledge “You”

Canned “I’m incredibly proud of your school book report.”

Credible “You must be so proud of your school book report.”

 

Find out more about Prestige Preschool Academy and our positive approach to learning here !

From an article originally published in the January 2012 issue of Parents magazine.  magazine article

Image: Washington Post 7/7/2015

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The Best Pets for Kids

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February 19, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy – The Best Pets for Kids

The Best Pets for Kids

 

What are some of the best pets for kids?  Pets can  be a chance for kids to learn valuable life lessons as they care for a living creature. Pets can teach children about responsibility and dependability with parents’ guidance.  As an added bonus, some pets give affection in return for a child’s loving attention.  The first step is choosing the best pet for your family.

FISH

How about a fish?  A  fish may be the perfect “starter” pet for a child. But not just any fish will do. Goldfish may seem like the most obvious choice, but they’re actually more difficult to raise than the Siamese fighting fish (Betta fish).

Betta fish are Southeast Asian natives and are adapted to thrive in isolation, in surprisingly small amounts of stagnant water. No aerators, filters, heaters, or chemicals are required.

BIRDS

Birds can be excellent pets. But owning a bird is more demanding than caring for a  fish. Some birds are highly intelligent. Others are very social. All birds require almost daily attention.

A parakeet, canary or finch may be a good starter for kids who haven’t raised birds before.

SMALL MAMMALS

Smaller mammals, including hamsters, guinea pigs and gerbils, are relatively easy to raise. Most require only a small living space and simple care. Regular, gentle handling promotes friendliness, but bites are possible. Guinea pigs are can make excellent kid-friendly pets.

CATS

Kittens are childhood favorites. Who can resist the antics of a fluffy feline? Cats require regular veterinary checkups and immunizations, but less attention and care than dogs. A cat may be a better choice than a dog if your family has limited living space. Choose a kid-friendly breed.

DOGS

A cuddly puppy is probably the most classic children’s pet. But choosing the ideal dog involves more than falling for big brown eyes. Some breeds may be unsuitable for children.

Any breed or mix will need a commitment of time and effort. Puppies must be housebroken and require daily exercise, regular veterinary checkups and immunizations, and plenty of love.

Owning a pet can be a positive experience for children. Pets provide companionship, entertainment, and educational opportunities. But pet ownership is also serious business. Pets are living creatures that require regular care and attention.  Choosing the pet that will fit with your family is the first step.

 

From an article written by Dale Kiefer and Rena Goldman  Article
Medically Reviewed on March 3, 2015 by George Krucik, MD, MBA

 

 

Some References for more information:

 

image: www.GoodTherapy.org 

 

 

habits of healthy kids

5 Habits of Healthy Kids

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February 17, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy – 5 Habits of Healthy Kids

5 Habits of Healthy Kids

Here are 5 habits of healthy kids that you will want to put into place in your family to avoid illness this year.  They are simple and make sense, but children need to practice them to make them a habit!  You may find that your child is the healthiest one in the neighborhood.

Keep hands clean

The healthy way to wash hands is to scrub for 15-20 seconds.  Teach your child to sing “Happy Birthday” to themselves—twice—before rinsing.  Remind them to “scrub” up after preschool or play dates and before they eat.

Be active every day

Studies have shown that regular exercise can reduce the number of cold and flu episodes during a year.  “Exercise is better than any advertised cure or miracle,” according to Harley A. Rothbart, M.D., Parents magazine advisor and author of Germ Proof Your Kids: the Complete Guide to Protecting (Without Overprotecting) Your Family from Infections (ASM Press, 2007).

Get plenty of ZZZs

The healthy habit of getting enough sleep is very important for children.  Dr. Rothbart says that sleep deprivation nearly doubles the risk of getting a cold or flu.  Most preschoolers need 11-13 hours of sleep per day and babies need about 14 hours per day.

Avoid touching your face

The reality is that viruses enter the body through the nose, eyes, and mouth.  Help your child keep their hands away from their face.  Also, teach them not to share a straw, cup or toothbrush!

Consume a balanced and healthy diet

Healthy eating means healthy kids.  Make sure the meal has plenty of colorful fruits and vegetables that will help boost your child’s immune system.  Some of those immune building foods are broccoli, strawberries and oranges along with tuna, milk and cereals.  Yogurt with probiotics helps to build defenses.  YUM.

Make Foods More Nutritious for Kids

 

From an article by Michelle Crouch, Parents Magazine

 

 

 

new preschool centers

Little Things Mean a Lot to Kids

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February 12, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy – Little Things Mean a Lot to Kids

 

Little things really do mean a lot to kids and will have a huge impact on their lives.  These little things may seem silly or trivial to adults, but they will make your child smile!  Here is a list to get you started:

  1. Cook heart-shaped pancakes for breakfast.
  2. Wear that macaroni necklace to work. Well, at least until you’re at work.
  3. Tape your family slogan (Unstoppable! We can, we will! We’ve got this!) to your refrigerator door and invoke it whenever your child feels discouraged.
  4. Go for a walk with just one child.
  5. Slip a note (and an occasional small treat) into her lunch box.
  6. Say “yes” to something usually off-limits, like sitting on the counter.
  7. Go ahead: Let your 4-year-old stomp in every puddle along the way. Even without rain boots.
  8. Get out the glitter glue and make a birthday card for your child.
  9. Take in a pet that needs a home—and a child’s love.
  10. Cultivate your own traditions: Taco Tuesdays, Sunday-afternoon bike ride, apple picking every fall.
  11. Ask your child to teach you how to do something for a change. And once you get the hang of it, be sure to tell him what a good teacher he is.
  12. Let your child wear her dress-up clothes to the supermarket. All month if she wants to.
  13. Let your child overhear you saying something wonderful about her.
  14. Make a secret family handshake.
  15. Hang a whiteboard in her room to leave messages for each other.
  16. Start a pillow fight.
  17. Share your old diaries, photos, and letters from when you were her age.
  18. Thank your child when he does a chore on his own—even if it’s just hanging up a wet towel without prompting or refilling the empty water pitcher.

 

from an article by Margery D. Rosen – Parents Magazine 30 Little Things That Mean a Lot to Kids

image – DeltaDental.com

Best Creative Art Activities for Preschoolers

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February 10, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy – The Best Creative Art Activities for Preschoolers

Best Creative Art Activities for Preschools

Preschoolers and process-focused art experiences are a match made in creativity heaven!  The best creative art activities for preschoolers are those that are process-focused.  What are process-focused art experiences?  Here are the characteristics of preschool process-focused art experiences as explained by Dr. Laurel Bongiorno, Champlain College.

Characteristics of Preschool Process-focused Art Experiences

  • There are no step-by-step instructions
  • There is no sample for children to follow
  • There is no right or wrong way to explore and create
  • The art is focused on the experience and on exploration
  • The art is unique and original
  • The experience is relaxing or calming

In her article in Teaching Young Children, Dr. Bongiorno continues with a list of easy art activities and tips that offer open-ended, creative art experiences for preschoolers.  Open-ended art experiences will offer hours of fun for you and your preschool child.  As she says, “Remember that it’s the children’s art, not yours.”

Open-ended, creative preschool art experiences

  • Easel painting with a variety of paints and paintbrushes (with no directions)
  • Watercolor painting
  • Exploring and creating with clay or homemade dough
  • Finger painting
  • Printing, painting and stamping (stamps purchased or made with sponges)
  • Collages using tissue paper, glue sticks, scissors, and recycled materials

What do preschoolers learn through process-focused art?

  • Preschoolers relax, focus, feel successful, and can express their feelings
  • Preschoolers compare, predict, plan, and problem solve
  • Preschoolers use small motor skills to paint, write, glue, use clay, and make collages

Art does teach preschoolers more than just the names of colors.  Your preschool child’s social, cognitive, and physical skills will grow along with their creativity!  These are life skills that will support a happy, healthy, creative child.

 

From Teaching Young Children, a NAEYC Publication    By LAUREL BONGIORNO

Process-focused Art Experiences

 

Why Teach Baby Sign Language?

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February 5, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy – Baby Signing Time

Why Teach your Baby Sign Language?

When children’s hands are moving, their minds are learning.

Children are able to understand language as early as 6 months, but the ability to speak requires complex fine motor skills that don’t develop until much later. The result is a frustration and tantrums.

On the other hands, the motor skills required to use sign language develop much sooner than spoken language.  Children who learn baby sign language can start using signs as early as 6 to 9 months! The result is a baby who can express her wants and needs.

For babies, sign language is a visual language. Many basic signs resemble what they mean. For example, to sign ball, you show the shape of a ball with your hands. See some examples on our Baby Sign Language Dictionary. This makes sign language fun and easy for kids.

Teaching your baby sign language can unlock the world around them and give their minds a head start.

  • Open a window to your child’s heart & mind
  • Reduce tantrums & increase bonding
  • Build vocabulary & instill confidence
  • Cognitive benefits of being bilingual

Prestige Preschool Academy parents love Baby Signing Time !  For more information about this program see the Baby Signing Time website here.

Baby Signing Time   Here is a video!  Baby Signing Video

 

Image – sheknows.com

 

 

 

 

 

Good Foods for Healthy Teeth

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February 3, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy

Good Foods for Kids’ Teeth

Candy for kids is not on the “good” list, but here are some foods that are actually good for your child’s teeth!  Since February is Children’s Dental Health month, here is a list of some dental hygiene heroes.  Your child will benefit and the dentist will be impressed.

Oranges, kiwis, strawberries, limes, and peppers

Fruits high in Vitamin C in fruits such as oranges, limes, kiwis, cantaloupe, papaya, and strawberries help kill bacteria in the mouth and promotes a healthy supply of collagen in the gums that encourage healthy teeth. Other good vegetable sources: red, yellow, and orange peppers; tomatoes; and sweet potatoes.  After eating, wait for about 30 minutes before brushing.

Milk, yogurt, and cheese

Sugar feeds other types of bacteria in your child’s mouth that produce cavity-causing acid. When your child drinks milk or eats yogurt or cheese — which are rich in calcium, vitamin D, and phosphate — it raises the pH level in his mouth, lowers acid levels, and reduces the risk of tooth decay, says Ray J. Jurado, DDS, director of pediatric dentistry at Children’s Memorial Hospital, in Chicago.

Raw carrots, celery, cauliflower, green beans, and snap peas

Crisp veggies are “chewing foods” that mechanically clean your child’s teeth and gums. “These foods naturally scrape away plaque that builds up between meals or that kids miss when brushing,” says family dentist Jimmy Wu, DDS, of San Diego. Encourage your child to eat slowly and to completely chew each crunchy mouthful.

Sesame, sunflower, and pumpkin seeds, and nuts

Nuts and seeds contain natural fats that coat teeth and help shield against bacteria, says Dr. Wu. The oils in the seeds help strengthen enamel, making teeth more resistant to cavities, and most seeds also contain calcium. Kids older than 4 can eat trail mix as a healthy snack.

The Dentist “No No” List

If your kid eats these, be sure he brushes well afterward.

  • Gummy candy (even vitamins)
  • Caramel
  • Taffy
  • Carbonated drinks
  • Fruit drinks with high-fructose corn syrup
  • Bubble gum (with sugar)
  • Raisins
  • Potato chips
  • Hard candy
  • Honey

Original article by Gina Roberts -Grey, Parents Magazine, found hereSmile Savers

 

 

 

6 Helpful Tips If Your Child Has the Flu

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January 29, 2016

Helpful Tips If Your Child Has the Flu

Here are 6 helpful tips if your child has the flu.  Children younger than 5 years old are among those who are at a high risk for serious complications when the flu hits.  If symptoms are reported within the first 2 days of the illness, your doctor might prescribe an antiviral medicine, but that only shortens the course of infection by about 2 days.  What can you do to help ease the symptoms?

  1. Offer plenty of fluids (fever, which is common with the flu, can lead to dehydration). If your child is tired of drinking plain water, try ice pops, icy drinks mixed in a blender, and soft fruits (like melons or grapes).
  2. Encourage your child to rest in bed or on the couch with a supply of magazines, books, quiet music, and perhaps a favorite movie.
  3. Give acetaminophen or ibuprofen for aches and pains as directed by your doctor (but do not give aspirin unless your doctor directs you to do so, as it has been linked to a rare but serious illness called Reye syndrome).
  4. Dress your child in layers so you can add and remove layers during bouts of chills or fever.
  5. Ask a close relative or faraway friend to call and help lift your child’s spirits.
  6. Take care of yourself and the other people in your family!  Check with your physician about a flu vaccine. Also, wash your hands well and often, especially after picking up used tissues.

 

Read more at KidsHealth.org  Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, MD

 

family history

Family History is Good for Kids

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Written by Prestige Preschool Academy on October 5, 2015

Family History is Good for Kids

 

October is Family History Month!  This is the perfect time to help your child understand his family history.  Research out of Emory University has found that kids who know more about their family history can turn out to be more emotionally resilient than children who don’t. Feeling like they are part of something larger than themselves—a family—gives them a greater sense of their “intergenerational self.” And that’s a good thing.

But how do you get kids to put down the phone or tablet long enough to introduce them to their past? We’re glad you asked. We’re celebrating Family History Month with a heap of great ideas for getting the next generation into their ancestors.

  • Family History Bingo
    • Create a family bingo card with five columns and five rows and simply add family photos and play!
  • Where in the World?
    • Get a wall map and show children where their ancestors lived and migration paths.  This is a great way to learn about the world.
  • Family History Road Trip!
    • Take the family on road trips to places that are significant to your family.  Creating new family memories is part of the itinerary.
  • Family History Journalist
    • Have a budding journalist?  Have them capture family interviews by video, audio or photos.
  • Family Cookbook
    • During family gatherings collect recipes and involve your family in creating a fun family cookbook.
  • Create a Family Tree
    • It’s important for children to understand family relationships.  Help them complete their own family tree.

Be sure to share your memories of family members and tell stories about your childhood too.  Let your children know about the struggles your family had as you were growing up.  They will be better equipped to cope in better and difficult times.

 

Learn more here: Family History Activities

For help searching for your family history, check out these helpful sites:   Family Search  Write a Family History

 

Photo DA Blodgett from Grand Rapids History.org

 

 

story time

Story Time Boosts Your Child’s Brain Power

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Written by Prestige Preschool Academy on October 5, 2015

Boost your child’s brain power.

 

Grab The Very Hungry Caterpillar and cozy up with your kid—new research suggests story time might boost your child’s brain power.

A recent study  found that reading to children positively effects the areas of the brain that support reading skills. The results showed that children who are read to more often had increased activity in the areas of the brain which lay the foundation for learning, imagination and reading.

Behavioral evidence has shown that children who are read to, especially before school entry, experience stronger parent-child relationships and learn valuable language and literacy skills.

“We hope that this work will guide further research on shared reading and the developing brain to help improve interventions and identify children at risk for difficulties as early as possible, increasing the chances that they will be successful in the wonderful world of books,” Hutton said.

Story time is more than just quiet time before bed.  Story time helps develop your child’s brain and prepares him for school.  Read to your child each day.  It’s a win-win situation for you and your child!

Need some story time  inspiration to get started?  Check out this list of 40 classic children’s books even adults love.

 

See more at: Story Time and Brain Development

Read the full article here: Science Backed Reason for Reading to Your Child – by Grace Elkus

Image credit: Enquire