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practice everyday preventative actions

Practicing Everyday Preventative Actions

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Practicing everyday preventative actions are essential in helping to keep everyone healthy.

Remind everyone in your household of the importance of practicing everyday preventive actions that can help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue.
  • Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily (e.g., tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles) using a regular household detergent and water.
    • If surfaces are dirty, they should be cleaned using a detergent and water prior to disinfection. For disinfection, a list of products with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved emerging viral pathogens claims, maintained by the American Chemistry Council Center for Biocide Chemistries (CBC), is available at Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Fighting Productspdf iconexternal icon. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Always wash your hands with soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.

The excerpt above is from CDC

 

What we are doing to help prevent illness

At all of our Academy’s across the nation, we are practicing everyday preventative actions. We are constantly hand washing and sanitizing all areas, including high traffic touchpoints. We are following the guidelines given by the CDC, Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. We have implemented additional procedures at our centers to detect symptoms of the virus and limit or eliminate its transmission. Temperatures will be taken of those attending our centers. We have stopped family-style serving during mealtime. Vendors that provide supplemental activities are no longer allowed into our centers. Our staff is committed to keeping and maintaining a safe and clean environment.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please reach out to your Center Director at Prestige Preschool Academy.

Prestige Preschool Academy

How Does Your Garden Grow?

By Apple Valley School News, Aurora School News, Brooklyn Park School News, Carlsbad School News, Child Development, Chino Hills School News, Claremont School News, Classroom Learning, Eastvale School News, Elk Grove School News, Family Fun, Gardening, Health & Wellness, Irvine Oak Creek School News, Natomas School News, News & Blog, Parenting Tips, Roseville School News, Search by Age, Seasons & Holidays
May 2018 – Prestige Preschool Academy – Start a Garden with Your Children

How Does Your Garden Grow?

 

Gardening with your children is a great bonding experience and the lessons they learn will astound you.  After harvesting a carrot from the garden you may be surprised that your “picky eater” really likes veggies.  Plus, you will be outside and exercising!

Here are some age-by-age garden ideas for your little green thumbs.

Age 2

  • Speed-garden. Toddlers and waiting don’t mix. For fast results, place a few pea or bean seeds and a slightly moistened cotton ball in a see-through plastic cup or sandwich bag (tape it to the window for maximum sun and easy viewing). “This is the absolute easiest way to begin,” says Cohen. “You’ll see sprouts within a week.” Then transfer the seedlings to a garden or container (see “No Backyard? No Problem!” below).
  • Let ’em get dirty. “Give your child a small hand trowel and let her search through the soil for worms,” says Rose Judd-Murray, a youth gardening specialist with the National Gardening Association. “She can even carefully handle the worms and measure how long they are.”

Ages 3 to 4

  • Build a bean tepee. This easy, fast-growing project makes a terrific fort. Pick a spot that gets at least six hours of sun per day. Buy five 6-foot wooden stakes (or use fallen tree branches sturdy enough to support a growing plant) and stick them a few inches into the ground, tying the stakes together at the top like a tepee. Add a bit of new soil around each stake and have kids press a few pole-bean seeds an inch or so into the ground. Sprouts will wind their way up the stakes in a couple of weeks.
  • Keep a calendar. Preschoolers are learning patience and a sense of time—concepts that can be reinforced in the garden. Use a calendar to highlight the days when you expect seeds to germinate. To add to kids’ sense of accomplishment—and make the waiting more bearable—have them put a sticker or check mark on days they water and weed.
  • Choose the right plants. For the best chance of success, pick easy-to-grow veggies such as radishes, carrots and lettuce. Seeds that are big enough for little fingers to handle easily include sunflowers, nasturtiums, beans, and peas.

Ages 5 to 6

  • Start with seedlings. For an edible haul faster, start with small veggie plants instead of seeds; kids’ feelings of accomplishment will be boosted by the quick results.
  • Create a storybook garden. Read a favorite garden-themed book and create your own garden to match. Two favorites: The Carrot Seed, by Ruth Krauss. Pick a sunny spot and plant carrot or sunflower seeds in the ground or a container (be sure to choose a place with enough room—sunflowers can grow up to 15 feet tall!). The wow factor with sunflowers makes them a special favorite with kindergarten kids.

No Backyard? No Problem

You can still grow plants in a container garden on a porch or windowsill, says gardening expert Rebecca P. Cohen. To get started, you’ll need a 12-inch-diameter bucket with good drainage (soil that’s too wet is bad for plants); potting mix; and a location with full sun every day. Or add a fun twist with containers that can be adapted for growing, such as milk cartons, baskets, plastic pails or items in the recycling bin (poke holes in your container if necessary).

Gardening at Your Local Prestige Preschool Academy 

Find your nearest Prestige Preschool Academy and see how our gardens grow!!

 

 

Read more at KidsGardening.org

From Parenting Magazine – By Charlotte Latvala

 

 

Best Creative Art Activities for Preschoolers

By Apple Valley School News, Aurora School News, Brooklyn Park School News, Carlsbad School News, Child Development, Chino Hills School News, Claremont School News, Cooking & Nutrition, Eastvale School News, Elk Grove School News, Health & Wellness, Irvine Oak Creek School News, Natomas School News, News & Blog, Parenting Tips, Roseville School News, Search by Age
February 10, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy – The Best Creative Art Activities for Preschoolers

Best Creative Art Activities for Preschools

Preschoolers and process-focused art experiences are a match made in creativity heaven!  The best creative art activities for preschoolers are those that are process-focused.  What are process-focused art experiences?  Here are the characteristics of preschool process-focused art experiences as explained by Dr. Laurel Bongiorno, Champlain College.

Characteristics of Preschool Process-focused Art Experiences

  • There are no step-by-step instructions
  • There is no sample for children to follow
  • There is no right or wrong way to explore and create
  • The art is focused on the experience and on exploration
  • The art is unique and original
  • The experience is relaxing or calming

In her article in Teaching Young Children, Dr. Bongiorno continues with a list of easy art activities and tips that offer open-ended, creative art experiences for preschoolers.  Open-ended art experiences will offer hours of fun for you and your preschool child.  As she says, “Remember that it’s the children’s art, not yours.”

Open-ended, creative preschool art experiences

  • Easel painting with a variety of paints and paintbrushes (with no directions)
  • Watercolor painting
  • Exploring and creating with clay or homemade dough
  • Finger painting
  • Printing, painting and stamping (stamps purchased or made with sponges)
  • Collages using tissue paper, glue sticks, scissors, and recycled materials

What do preschoolers learn through process-focused art?

  • Preschoolers relax, focus, feel successful, and can express their feelings
  • Preschoolers compare, predict, plan, and problem solve
  • Preschoolers use small motor skills to paint, write, glue, use clay, and make collages

Art does teach preschoolers more than just the names of colors.  Your preschool child’s social, cognitive, and physical skills will grow along with their creativity!  These are life skills that will support a happy, healthy, creative child.

 

From Teaching Young Children, a NAEYC Publication    By LAUREL BONGIORNO

Process-focused Art Experiences

 

Good Foods for Healthy Teeth

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February 3, 2016 – Prestige Preschool Academy

Good Foods for Kids’ Teeth

Candy for kids is not on the “good” list, but here are some foods that are actually good for your child’s teeth!  Since February is Children’s Dental Health month, here is a list of some dental hygiene heroes.  Your child will benefit and the dentist will be impressed.

Oranges, kiwis, strawberries, limes, and peppers

Fruits high in Vitamin C in fruits such as oranges, limes, kiwis, cantaloupe, papaya, and strawberries help kill bacteria in the mouth and promotes a healthy supply of collagen in the gums that encourage healthy teeth. Other good vegetable sources: red, yellow, and orange peppers; tomatoes; and sweet potatoes.  After eating, wait for about 30 minutes before brushing.

Milk, yogurt, and cheese

Sugar feeds other types of bacteria in your child’s mouth that produce cavity-causing acid. When your child drinks milk or eats yogurt or cheese — which are rich in calcium, vitamin D, and phosphate — it raises the pH level in his mouth, lowers acid levels, and reduces the risk of tooth decay, says Ray J. Jurado, DDS, director of pediatric dentistry at Children’s Memorial Hospital, in Chicago.

Raw carrots, celery, cauliflower, green beans, and snap peas

Crisp veggies are “chewing foods” that mechanically clean your child’s teeth and gums. “These foods naturally scrape away plaque that builds up between meals or that kids miss when brushing,” says family dentist Jimmy Wu, DDS, of San Diego. Encourage your child to eat slowly and to completely chew each crunchy mouthful.

Sesame, sunflower, and pumpkin seeds, and nuts

Nuts and seeds contain natural fats that coat teeth and help shield against bacteria, says Dr. Wu. The oils in the seeds help strengthen enamel, making teeth more resistant to cavities, and most seeds also contain calcium. Kids older than 4 can eat trail mix as a healthy snack.

The Dentist “No No” List

If your kid eats these, be sure he brushes well afterward.

  • Gummy candy (even vitamins)
  • Caramel
  • Taffy
  • Carbonated drinks
  • Fruit drinks with high-fructose corn syrup
  • Bubble gum (with sugar)
  • Raisins
  • Potato chips
  • Hard candy
  • Honey

Original article by Gina Roberts -Grey, Parents Magazine, found hereSmile Savers

 

 

 

6 Helpful Tips If Your Child Has the Flu

By Apple Valley School News, Aurora School News, Brooklyn Park School News, Carlsbad School News, Child Development, Chino Hills School News, Claremont School News, Cooking & Nutrition, Eastvale School News, Elk Grove School News, Health & Wellness, Irvine Oak Creek School News, Natomas School News, News & Blog, Parenting Tips, Roseville School News, Safety, Schools
January 29, 2016

Helpful Tips If Your Child Has the Flu

Here are 6 helpful tips if your child has the flu.  Children younger than 5 years old are among those who are at a high risk for serious complications when the flu hits.  If symptoms are reported within the first 2 days of the illness, your doctor might prescribe an antiviral medicine, but that only shortens the course of infection by about 2 days.  What can you do to help ease the symptoms?

  1. Offer plenty of fluids (fever, which is common with the flu, can lead to dehydration). If your child is tired of drinking plain water, try ice pops, icy drinks mixed in a blender, and soft fruits (like melons or grapes).
  2. Encourage your child to rest in bed or on the couch with a supply of magazines, books, quiet music, and perhaps a favorite movie.
  3. Give acetaminophen or ibuprofen for aches and pains as directed by your doctor (but do not give aspirin unless your doctor directs you to do so, as it has been linked to a rare but serious illness called Reye syndrome).
  4. Dress your child in layers so you can add and remove layers during bouts of chills or fever.
  5. Ask a close relative or faraway friend to call and help lift your child’s spirits.
  6. Take care of yourself and the other people in your family!  Check with your physician about a flu vaccine. Also, wash your hands well and often, especially after picking up used tissues.

 

Read more at KidsHealth.org  Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, MD